Loop

Designer: Lex Pott

Loop as seen on The Product Edit 1

Pott’s designs are always reduced down to the core of what is necessary for the object.

Loop as seen on The Product Edit 2

This is the kind of design that I most want to champion with the articles on this blog. It is very hard to get the balance right between an object being stripped of any adornment (e.g. greenhouse metal shelving units) and an object having just enough beautification in it to satisfy the human need for comfort. And actually, where you draw that line is different for everyone.

Loop as seen on The Product Edit 3

For me Pott, and Loop, strikes the right balance. Just enough embellishment to get me to relate to it. Colour and curves.

Loop as seen on The Product Edit 4

Where do you draw the line? Do you prefer more glitz on your candlestick!?

Image Credits: Lex Pott

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Macchiato Mugs

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Designer: Romy Northover of ‘NO.’ ceramics

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

The proportions of these little macchiato mugs are so well placed and thought out. The long, gaping handles contrast effectively with the espresso sized cups.

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

They’re so beautifully considered that I’m willing to overlook the fact that I only know one person who has ever ordered a macchiato! Though that is entirely my own fault for both being Irish and living in Britain. We only just got coffee shops for realsies in the last 5 years or so. We have other culture OK?! (Our swill baskets for one.)

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

Ms. Northover opened an artist’s space in New York in 2012 at Togei Kyoshitsu, available to students of the traditional Japanese pottery school, where anyone can take classes. Originally trained in European ceramic arts in Venice, Berlin and at Goldsmiths here in London, she changed focus after working in Hong Kong. She now favours the Japanese techniques of Kinuneri (a kneading method that’s also used in making soba-noodle dough), Tebineri (similar to coil pots) and Rokuro (throwing -watch this mesmerising video-). I imagine availing of the classes provided at the artist’s spaces at Togei Kyoshitsu helped her hone her skills.

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

The artistic, painterly brush strokes daubed onto the little mugs perfectly reference the Japanese workmanship. They have a calligraphic flair and a looseness that only comes with years of experience. These mugs are part of the Freedom collection.

‘No.’ ceramics studio is in Long Island City NYC and is stocked around the world but, as always (if you can), its nice to buy direct from the artist at her online shop.

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

I can’t finish up this post without showing you Northover’s gorgeous tea cups that lead me to find the ‘No.’ studio range:

Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

If you do like her stuff then check out the rest of her work on romyno.com, don’t miss the Mountain Bolt and Tigris collections. For the nosey, like me, check out her Pinterest, where you can really see her influences, especially in ‘World’, ‘Spirit Animal’, and ‘2D’.

Image Credits: Romy No. / No.’s Instagram

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Swill Bench

Designers: Lorna Singleton & Sebastian Cox

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Lorna Singleton is one of the young adults who have taken up the practice of Cumbrian swill basketry, learning from the South Lakes craftsman Owen Jones. Swilling is a process of tearing Oak along the grain of wood in order to keep the wood’s inherent strength and flexibility. The much less flexible alternative, timber, must be sawn across the grain at some point, which loses strength when we do so.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Oak swill strips, when woven, can hold similar weights as timber at a fraction of the thickness. This has allowed Singleton & Cox to design this bench, and an accompanying stool, with a beautifully slim profile.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Cox, a hugely successful woodworking studio (who’s work I’m sure I will write about more fully soon), manufactures the gently tapered English ash frame and Singleton weaves the English oak swill seats. The result is tactile, sturdy and achingly well proportioned.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Both these items, and a couple that are a slightly more rustic, are for sale at The New Craftsman. It is worth noting, to their credit, that Singleton and Cox both manage coppiced woodland in Cumbria and Kent respectively and supply themselves with their own wood. Prices reflect this.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

More of Sebastian Cox’s work can be seen at sebastiancox.co.uk

Image Credit : The New Craftsman

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Ceramic Tableware

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Designer: Hyu-jin Jo

This is all about texture.

Hyu-jin Jo as seen on The Product Edit

Hyu-jin Jo works from a base of simple shapes (my favourite!) and layers the texture on by carving away from the surface of the ceramics. She is currently exhibiting in ‘MADE FRESH’ until April 25th at Yorkshire Artspace in Sheffield, England.

Hyu-jin Jo as seen on The Product Edit

In an interview with Made North she divulges that she is most proud of the blue and black earthenware pieces because she created the colours in the clay and slipwork herself, which is admirable. But to me, the way light passes through the bone china bowls, at the places where she has carved the surface away, pushes their aesthetic above and beyond the heavier blue/black pieces. They actually glow… So pretty.

Hyu-jin Jo as seen on The Product Edit

Hyu-jin Jo’s work is influenced by ancient Korean ceramics and technology. The proportions are really well balanced, especially this teapot with a looped handle and a happy little spout. Christ, I think she is still at Uni too… *Wails: What talent is there left over for rest of us?!*

Hyu-jin Jo as seen on The Product Edit

Made North itself was a bit of a brainwave, “a platform for northern designer/makers [that] showcases and promotes work via contemporary gallery space in the heart of Sheffield and online [at] www.madenorthstore.co.uk.” Looks good to me   : )

Image Credits: Great Northern Events / Made North

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Buoy

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Designer: Martin Hlubucek

Buoy by Martin Hlubucek on The Product Edit

This series of Glass vessels were exhibited recently at Ambiente Frankfurt and brought to my attention by this Design Milk article about the event.

Buoy by Martin Hlubucek on The Product Edit

With their shapely forms I am really pleased that they are more substantial than most vases. The swollen size and beautiful shape of the vases work really well together. This Czech glass artist has used the method of blowing blown layered glass into a rotation mold. They are designed so that the base of the vase floats above the table surface slightly, most noticeable in the pic below, a lovely trick that lightens the load visually.

Buoy by Martin Hlubucek on The Product Edit

The bottle greens (below) and rich blues are really traditional glass colours and are in a completely different palette to the light greens and white glass used to blow some of the pieces. For my own design projects I generally use a couple of choice colours within the same tonal range, but here is an example of how using two extremes of palettes can be really interesting and change the feel of the object completely. The 70’s shapes have launched themselves back onto the high street this spring and by the looks of it it might be bringing the 60’s right along with it.

Buoy by Martin Hlubucek on The Product Edit

Image sources: Material Times / sig in / AD Decoration / Fiera Magazine

 

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