Wax Sculptures

Designer: Helmut Smits

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I thought these candles were products. They are not.

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

They are sculptures! The artist sells prints (20 x 30 cm at €150+vat on Smits’ website if your interested), but you can’t actually buy the product itself, or the ‘original’ I guess its called.

Well maybe you can, if you contact him and are super nice, but I imagine the price would be prohibitive if you wanted to use the candle, like I do.

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

So because this is art – not design- I will let the work speak for itself for a change, instead of gabbing on about what I like about these candles.

Suggested internal debate while scrolling down;

Art vs. Design …

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk  Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk  Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk  Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk  Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk  Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk  Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk  Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk  Helmut Smits wax sculptures. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

This isn’t even all of them, these are just my favourites!

Image Credits: Helmut Smits’ Website
(Though I first saw these candles on Sight Unseen)

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.

 

SaveSave

Malva Sofa

Designed by: Anon for Habitat

Malva by Habitat. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I’ve been watching Anime shows recently (not the naughty kind, just the Japanese animated stories!) and something struck me when I saw this sofa. It reminds me so much of how manga artists depict excitement or magic bubbling up in people or a house or pet.

Malva by Habitat. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

These artists are great at representing how we feel about something in a visual way. If a character was feeling trepidation walking into their office building at night the animator will make the walls bubble or shiver occasionally behind the character’s back. Its really effective as an extra way of showing how they are feeling, their perception of the world around them.

Malva by Habitat. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

When you first watch anime it can be a little confusing – “Errm… is that actually happening?” but you soon get your eye in.

Malva by Habitat. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The designer of the Malva range has conveyed life and human emotion in the object with the same skill of the comic artists. This sofa would really animate a room. Its bulbous shapes make it look bouncy, it is inviting play and fun.

Malva by Habitat. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 

The off kilter backrests make me want to properly lounge myself along on it. I can’t imagine two or three people sitting bolt upright on this piece of furniture. It has been designed for snugglers and blanket hogs. Malva is 70% wool too so that deep red will feel as luxurious as it looks.

Habitat Logo. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Habitat has always been a favourite of mine. I even got a job in Manchester’s Habitat with the intention of staying in the company for… well… life (!) until they shut down all 31 shops that weren’t in London. It still annoys me that I didn’t even voice my desire to keep my toe in the company, if you don’t ask you don’t get. Listen to your Mothers 21 year olds!

Personal idiocies aside, the company’s reshuffle and focus on the European market has stood to them. They have managed to hold on to their focus of bringing fresh design to the UK.

If anyone knows which Habitat designers were involved in the Malva range please let me know in the comments below, my research hasn’t produced any specific names yet. And I do like to champion the designers themselves!

Image Credits: Habitat

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.

Bloomington Bookcase

Designed by: Terry Dwan

Bloomington Bookcase. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

This storage set makes me think of a house I once visited as a really small child, in the back of beyond, in Ireland. It was one the of the first houses I came across that did not fit the mould. It wasn’t a semi-detached, it wasn’t two stories. It wasn’t normal.

My older sister and I had, quite unusually, been brought to a grown-up’s party.  It was terrifying, exhilarating and exotic. The hosts were Nordic. There was a sauna. “A what Mum!?” “A sauna! You go in and the air gets very, very hot… It’s good for you! Good for your skin.” The weirdness of this small, empty room completely clad in soft, strokeable timber gave me the creeps. The good creeps, if such a thing exists!

Bloomington Bookcase. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Anyway these Norwegians were not the cool beauties we see all around us now, all clad in various shades of grey and black. They were raucous. RAUCOUS! Their sprawling, one story house (the word bungalow is in need of a good revamp I think) wasn’t ‘designery’, it was simple, useful, and “lived in”. It’s the kind of place that I want to live in now, 20 years after first seeing the place.

Bloomington Bookcase. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

This ‘bookshelf’ epitomises the furniture I want to use in my own home. It is simple, it is honest. Hides sins, displays treasures. Dwan designed it for the Italian company ‘Riva 1920′.

I will have one of the removable boxes stuffed haphazardly with blankets. A couple of bottles of dark rum and whiskey on the open shelf, jostling for space with piles of paper and paints. Not a curated display in sight. Ah bliss.

Image Credit: Bonluxat

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.

Haze ‘Desk with Three legs’

Designed by: Wonmin Park

Wonmin Park as seen on the Product Edit

This whole series of furniture is dreamy! Haze is the right name for it. Wonmin Park have been adding to the Haze series on and off since 2013 and the more recent pieces, like this desk, are in a more toned down pallet of navys and ghostly greys.

Wonmin Park as seen on the Product Edit 1

Spacial balance is toyed with throughout Haze. Darker colours are used as a subtle counterbalance. You can see this particularly well in some of the earlier tables like ‘Long Low’ below.

Wonmin Park as seen on the Product Edit 6

If we imagine the overhang on the left to be red and the opposite leg to be white, you can really see how important the placement of colour is on a product. We would feel like the table was far less stable! It can make us feel really safe or dead uneasy, depending on how colour is arranged.

Wonmin Park as seen on the Product Edit 5

Wonmin Park as seen on the Product Edit 4

Image Credits: Carpenters Workshop Gallery via Wonmin Park

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.

Bleu De Four Plates

Designers: Aymeric & Ronan Pailler

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 1

Come the end of October colour is leeching from our meals as broccoli, radishes, and tomatoes step aside for cauliflower, turnip mash, and parsnips.

Delicious!

Well, I add butter to all the latter so thats probably why, but still… delicious.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 2

As yummy as a plate of cream coloured comfort-food tastes, it doesn’t exactly look appetising. There are no contrasting colours to jazz things up. Dun da da Duuuun, thats where these deep, dark, bright plates come in.

I love a dark plate. My favourite in our house is a 6 year old dark grey and black, almost watercolour effect, plate “Mai” from Habitat. I bought it cheap from the staff ‘write-offs’ bin while working there. Food looks fantastic on it, but now that Winter is coming (so everyone keeps reminding us!) I need a bit more colour. The Pailler’s produce a full set of tableware in this range but the simplicity of the plate is divine.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 5

 

Deep, dark, and bright. Thats how I described them a minute ago. The skill in achieving this bright colour, desperately trying to break through a seemingly darker overlay, is in the glazing process.

The white porcelain beneath the glaze is more visible at the edges where there is more tension on the glaze while it is still in liquid form (woop physics!). Because of this the glaze is slightly thinner at the rim, resulting in the edges appearing to glow from within. A high firing temp produces the overall darkness of the pieces. A centuries old process that is worth the price tag.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 4

Products available at The Conran Shop in the UK and Site Corot in the EU.

Image Credits: Site Corot / The Conran Shop

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.