Loop

Designer: Lex Pott

Loop as seen on The Product Edit 1

Pott’s designs are always reduced down to the core of what is necessary for the object.

Loop as seen on The Product Edit 2

This is the kind of design that I most want to champion with the articles on this blog. It is very hard to get the balance right between an object being stripped of any adornment (e.g. greenhouse metal shelving units) and an object having just enough beautification in it to satisfy the human need for comfort. And actually, where you draw that line is different for everyone.

Loop as seen on The Product Edit 3

For me Pott, and Loop, strikes the right balance. Just enough embellishment to get me to relate to it. Colour and curves.

Loop as seen on The Product Edit 4

Where do you draw the line? Do you prefer more glitz on your candlestick!?

Image Credits: Lex Pott

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.

‘Joy’ Vanity Table

Designed by: Nanna Ditzel

Joy by Nanna Ditzel as seen on The Product Edit

I have loved this vanity table since 2008 when I first came across it. I had chosen Nanna Ditzel as the subject of my terrible poster on ‘a designer you admire’ in first year of university. Nanna seemed like a really cool woman who worked hard and wasn’t afraid to take the credit she deserved for it. Incase you’re not familiar with her, she is a much celebrated Danish woman who graduated Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen in furniture design in 1946. That gives you a sense of time and place for her, a time (but not necessarily a place) that a woman was not expected to excel in fields that required a measure of engineering.

Joy by Nanna Ditzel as seen on The Product Edit

I love the shapes in this piece, spheres, and by extension hemispheres, float my boat. I imagine its for all the same reasons they have floated peoples boats for thousands of years. The wholeness, both the infinity and finality of them, the freedom of movement a rectangle can never dream of!

I’m definitely going to be looking into the psychology of shapes this afternoon. It must affect logo design a lot… Oval logo – ethereal company. Rectangular logo – dependable company.

Joy by Nanna Ditzel as seen on The Product Edit

There is something about the table part that reminds me of chunky toddler toys, the kind where you have to put the cube through the square and the cylinder through the circle etc. and also Duplo, Lego’s baby brother. I must have had some sort of toy that swung, or slotted in and out, like the drawers of this vanity table. The connection totally works for me, I very much feel like I’m playing dress up when I put on make-up or adjust my hair.

Joy by Nanna Ditzel as seen on The Product Edit

As part of the Joy bedroom range this is one of the only items still in production, a Joy bench that I’m not so hot on, but looks super comfy, also prevails. Produced in maple now from the Danish company Getama.

And in the interest of of giving you a giggle, here is a screenshot of that poster I mentioned. I cut it out along that line.. Yes sir-ee I did.

Julia Jacob's 1st Yr at MMU poster on Nanna Ditzel

Image Credits: Nanna Ditzel / Getama / Author’s Own

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.

3legs tables

Designer: David Tarcali at “Studio Nomad”

3legs Table Collection as seen on The Product Edit

I have been wanting to show you these tables for a loooong time now but it has never really seemed like the right day. A lot is riding on this you see… Because if you don’t loose your s*** over these sumptuous Venus-de-Tables (secretly, on the inside of course – we’re still pretending we’re normal to non-furniture obsessed folk right?) then I’m not sure we can be friends.

There. I said it.

3legs Table Collection as seen on The Product Edit

There is a graceful glamour to these pieces. The colours and the arrangement of the hemispheres make them aerial and light. The little collection has rhythm.

3legs Table Collection as seen on The Product Edit

Huunnnnghhh *flaps arms like a two year old* I just found out while doing some extra research that these tables have just been used for window displays by my favourite fashion house COS! All my design faves are hooking up, switt swooo!

cos

Ok, I’m calm.

3legs Table Collection as seen on The Product Edit

Price wise, they’re all €300 or under. Studio Nomad tell us that you can get it made in any RAL colour but they don’ t say how much extra that is. I’ll have a look into that for you and put it in a comment below. Here is the RAL colour chart from the company I use for my bent steel work: RAL Colour Chart . Though be warned, no online, or printed, colour chart is ever a perfect match!

P.s. Here is an extra little cutie they make… 28degrees

28 Degrees as seen on The Product Edit

You can buy the tables at Crowdy House for a limited time, after that I’d just contact Studio Nomad themselves (always the best way!).

Image Credits: Studio Nomad on Bēhance and Instagram.

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.

Crossed Double Seat

Designers: Fien Muller & Hannes Van Severen (Muller Van Severen)

Crossed Double Seat as seen on The Product Edit

Muller and Van Severen describe themselves as artists (photography and sculpture respectively) not designers. They aren’t particularly interested in ordinary furniture. All their pieces have a small social commentary or suggest different ways of using space.

Crossed Double Seat as seen on The Product Edit

For Muller making furniture is interesting to her when pieces are introduced to each other. The exquisite colour combos are also hers to brag about. Severen’s influence, I’m told, creates the “absurdity” which I *think* is referring to the off-beat angles seen in most of their other pieces (scroll on down for some photos of angled pieces). And as a sculptor I imagine the 3D nature of this on going furniture project suits him very well. They both bring important personal strengths to the project but they are keen to stress the benefit of working together in our kind of industry;

“Working as a duo obviates the individual ego all too prevalent in both the design and art world and allows each object to just exist.”

Hear, hear! I’ll shut up now and let you see the rest of their pieces.

Muller Van Severen as seen on The Product Edit

I like how they have left the welded steel frames ‘unfinished’ when coupled with thick natural leather and used a high gloss when coloured fabric is involved.

Muller Van Severen as seen on The Product Edit

Available to buy at Viaduct

Image Credits: Muller Van Severen , Viaduct 

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’

Swill Bench

Designers: Lorna Singleton & Sebastian Cox

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Lorna Singleton is one of the young adults who have taken up the practice of Cumbrian swill basketry, learning from the South Lakes craftsman Owen Jones. Swilling is a process of tearing Oak along the grain of wood in order to keep the wood’s inherent strength and flexibility. The much less flexible alternative, timber, must be sawn across the grain at some point, which loses strength when we do so.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Oak swill strips, when woven, can hold similar weights as timber at a fraction of the thickness. This has allowed Singleton & Cox to design this bench, and an accompanying stool, with a beautifully slim profile.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Cox, a hugely successful woodworking studio (who’s work I’m sure I will write about more fully soon), manufactures the gently tapered English ash frame and Singleton weaves the English oak swill seats. The result is tactile, sturdy and achingly well proportioned.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Both these items, and a couple that are a slightly more rustic, are for sale at The New Craftsman. It is worth noting, to their credit, that Singleton and Cox both manage coppiced woodland in Cumbria and Kent respectively and supply themselves with their own wood. Prices reflect this.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

More of Sebastian Cox’s work can be seen at sebastiancox.co.uk

Image Credit : The New Craftsman

Easily follow “The Product Edit” with Bloglovin’.