Punt Carafe

Designers: Lucy and Tobie Snowdowne (Two Create)

Two Create's Punt Carafe as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

A punt is the little hillock that you find indented in the bottom of wine bottles.

It’s a structural device, and strengthens the bottle a lot, but when I was younger I thought it was just a sneaky way to get less juice in my Ribena bottle. Cynical child!

Two Create's Punt Carafe as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The punts in this set are rewardingly full bodied. The smokey colour really emphasises the shapeliness too, darkening at the bulge where you are looking through three or four layers of the glass.

In researching this glassware I found out that the Snowdownes designed it for Habitat. I should have known! You can take the girl outta Habitat but, you can’t take Habitat out of the the cailín!

The shape of the glass slots perfectly on, to halo the carafe, when the pieces are put together as they are intended.

Two Create's Punt Carafe as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Image Credits: Two Create / Coin Quest / Joel’s Coins

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P.S. A punt is also the name of the Irish one pound coin that we used up until the Euro came in. All of the old Irish coinage was really beautiful, it documented our most beloved Irish wildlife.

The Stag was on the punt itself. What a beauty.

 

Irish Punt as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 

Fair Trade Baskets

Designer: Piet Hein Eek

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

To look at these trays, without knowing their name, you can be sure that they’ve borrowed their form from a traditional  craft.

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Asian? Indian?

Vietnamese 🙂

But the designer is Dutch, with a little help from the locals.

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I first saw them in SCP years ago in London and I have never forgotten them (or the Marimekko plates). After doing a bit of digging I now know that they are made from palm wood, which grows quickly but warps easily. Hein Eek designed these baskets to combat this issue, the thin laced slats can shrink and expand but the baskets remain intact.

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Hein Eek visited a workshop in Ben Tre at the request of Fair Forward (a Dutch fair trade company – formerly called Fair Trade Original) and designed a series of baskets for them to sell through Fair Forward to the international market. Upon returning to Ben Tre to teach and explain the complicated designs people kept coming forward to him with ways to improve on his design, they knew the materials best!

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

A local fisherman chipped in to show him the best way to knot the wire that now holds the slats together really snugly. A son and daughter of a forestry worker told him how they could season the wood to best minimise that damned warpage. 

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

These baskets are a commercial triumph and three family workshops have expanded to become a formal business operation in Vietnam. I imagine a huge part of their success is because Hein Eek listened to the locals and deigned their ideas and expertise into the products.

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

It is far too easy to think you know best and to think that your design is finished when you put down your drawing board and like what you see, but if you don’t listen and learn from the people making and using your products then you’ll never improve and grow as a designer.

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I am in the process of learning from the successes and failures of my first product collection (thankfully at lot more of the former!) and I’ll be wholeheartedly applying this knowledge in my second collection.

I can’t wait!

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Piet Hein Eek. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Image Credits: fonq.nl / The Future Perfect / Wergeld Winkel / flat

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Ring Dishes

Designed by: Lindsay Emery

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

These things are so pretty. I did not know what a ring dish was until today. Apparently they are “perfectly sized for holding your favourite sparkly rings and other tiny things.” I would be more likely to use them as drip dishes as in the image below.

Or coasters? They look about the right size for a glass. Im not really a ring girl so I’m trying to think up another use for these simply to justify buying one…

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Suite One Studio, Emery’s ceramics studio, creates full size plates and dishes too but the full size indigo ones do not have the gold detailing you can see on these tiny plates (sorry – ring dishes, I’m never going to get used to that!).

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Pink, indigo and pale blue are the only colours Emery is using at the moment and it makes for a very cohesive collection.

If you like her work you should definitely check out Suite One Studio’s Instagram, she is a flat-lay queen.

The dishes are hand thrown porcelain ( I love a good controlled wibbely edge) and the studio use a handmade ivory/white glaze before slinging on the expressive colours.

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Demand outstrips production at the moment so their website’s shop gets updated once a week, usually on a *Thursday* and it sells out fairly fast. Thankfully you are always able to see all of their current collections on the website and on each product’s page you can sign up for a notification on its restock date.

Image Credits: Suite One Studio / Suite One Studio’s Instagram

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Fleur de Lys Goblet

Designer – Van Verre (Company)

-CURVEBALL WARNING-

Van Verre. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Yeah. So… my aesthetic is usually quite sleek, simple and minimal.

But within every minimalist there is an ‘ethnic’, boho hoarder being cajoled into keeping schtum and staying in its box. Its zig-zag, pom-pomed, bejewelled box.

Van Verre. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

There isn’t any need to justify it. This kind of OTT product is stunningly beautiful, though getting the right balance between this ornate glassware and the rest of your room could be a bit tricky!

Rosy, slightly apricot-y, ice lolly fresh. I just want to lick it.

Van Verre. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

This glassware is handmade in Portugal in a workshop that has had 150 years of experience in mixing sand with color pigments. I love how the thick glass base moving up to the thin rim naturally creates an ombré effect. Fantastic glowing colours add to the opulence.

Van Verre.. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The process of hand blowing into moulds creates fairly uniform, but unique pieces. I’m particularly taken by the pink wine goblets at the moment but my favourite item and colour preference changes every other month. A sign of a strong collection.

Image Credits: Amara / Van Verre

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Bleu De Four Plates

Designers: Aymeric & Ronan Pailler

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 1

Come the end of October colour is leeching from our meals as broccoli, radishes, and tomatoes step aside for cauliflower, turnip mash, and parsnips.

Delicious!

Well, I add butter to all the latter so thats probably why, but still… delicious.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 2

As yummy as a plate of cream coloured comfort-food tastes, it doesn’t exactly look appetising. There are no contrasting colours to jazz things up. Dun da da Duuuun, thats where these deep, dark, bright plates come in.

I love a dark plate. My favourite in our house is a 6 year old dark grey and black, almost watercolour effect, plate “Mai” from Habitat. I bought it cheap from the staff ‘write-offs’ bin while working there. Food looks fantastic on it, but now that Winter is coming (so everyone keeps reminding us!) I need a bit more colour. The Pailler’s produce a full set of tableware in this range but the simplicity of the plate is divine.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 5

 

Deep, dark, and bright. Thats how I described them a minute ago. The skill in achieving this bright colour, desperately trying to break through a seemingly darker overlay, is in the glazing process.

The white porcelain beneath the glaze is more visible at the edges where there is more tension on the glaze while it is still in liquid form (woop physics!). Because of this the glaze is slightly thinner at the rim, resulting in the edges appearing to glow from within. A high firing temp produces the overall darkness of the pieces. A centuries old process that is worth the price tag.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 4

Products available at The Conran Shop in the UK and Site Corot in the EU.

Image Credits: Site Corot / The Conran Shop

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