Crossed Double Seat

Designers: Fien Muller & Hannes Van Severen (Muller Van Severen)

Crossed Double Seat as seen on The Product Edit

Muller and Van Severen describe themselves as artists (photography and sculpture respectively) not designers. They aren’t particularly interested in ordinary furniture. All their pieces have a small social commentary or suggest different ways of using space.

Crossed Double Seat as seen on The Product Edit

For Muller making furniture is interesting to her when pieces are introduced to each other. The exquisite colour combos are also hers to brag about. Severen’s influence, I’m told, creates the “absurdity” which I *think* is referring to the off-beat angles seen in most of their other pieces (scroll on down for some photos of angled pieces). And as a sculptor I imagine the 3D nature of this on going furniture project suits him very well. They both bring important personal strengths to the project but they are keen to stress the benefit of working together in our kind of industry;

“Working as a duo obviates the individual ego all too prevalent in both the design and art world and allows each object to just exist.”

Hear, hear! I’ll shut up now and let you see the rest of their pieces.

Muller Van Severen as seen on The Product Edit

I like how they have left the welded steel frames ‘unfinished’ when coupled with thick natural leather and used a high gloss when coloured fabric is involved.

Muller Van Severen as seen on The Product Edit

Available to buy at Viaduct

Image Credits: Muller Van Severen , Viaduct 

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Swill Bench

Designers: Lorna Singleton & Sebastian Cox

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Lorna Singleton is one of the young adults who have taken up the practice of Cumbrian swill basketry, learning from the South Lakes craftsman Owen Jones. Swilling is a process of tearing Oak along the grain of wood in order to keep the wood’s inherent strength and flexibility. The much less flexible alternative, timber, must be sawn across the grain at some point, which loses strength when we do so.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Oak swill strips, when woven, can hold similar weights as timber at a fraction of the thickness. This has allowed Singleton & Cox to design this bench, and an accompanying stool, with a beautifully slim profile.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Cox, a hugely successful woodworking studio (who’s work I’m sure I will write about more fully soon), manufactures the gently tapered English ash frame and Singleton weaves the English oak swill seats. The result is tactile, sturdy and achingly well proportioned.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Both these items, and a couple that are a slightly more rustic, are for sale at The New Craftsman. It is worth noting, to their credit, that Singleton and Cox both manage coppiced woodland in Cumbria and Kent respectively and supply themselves with their own wood. Prices reflect this.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

More of Sebastian Cox’s work can be seen at sebastiancox.co.uk

Image Credit : The New Craftsman

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Crescent Lounge Daybed

Designers: Vonnegut/Kraft.

Crescent Lounge

Calming. This day bed’s design is completely calming. Forget shivasanna. If you were to need a little mid afternoon break from life, this must be the way to do it.

Crescent Lounge by vonnegut kraft head rest

The way that the head rest is cradled in the arms of the wooden frame makes me feel like I would be safe and protected while dozing or daydreaming of softly billowing, linen curtains.

Crescent Lounge

The company who designed and produce them do offer to make them to your own fabric spec (from a range provided) but their default design of dusty pink and emerald teal complement the soap finished ash so delicately that I would stick with the designer’s original colour scheme.

Crescent Lounge

Crescent Lounge

Image source and where to buy: Vonnegut/Kraft

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