Bread from Scratch – Oven

Designer: Mirko Ihrig

Bread from Scratch. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

This bread oven is part of a larger story. It is part of Ihrig’s MA Thesis, he was exploring the issue that many people don’t know where their food comes from these days.

Bread from Scratch. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I know he’s right because I had a boyfriend during university that had never seen a chicken in real life. We lived in the North of England for peatsake!

Bread from Scratch. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Ihrig resolved to design a set of tools and items that would allow someone to make a loaf of bread from start to finish.

Bread from Scratch. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I love this designer’s ability to make this oven huggable. Just as it was cooling down in the twilight I’d be out there in the garden clutching this oven like it was a big dog, keeping warm from its friendly radiation.

Bread from Scratch. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Bread from Scratch. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The angled curves, the stable stance, the softly turned legs, the raw finishes and the presence of fire itself all contribute to my visceral reaction to this oven.

Image Credits: Mirko Ihrig / Milk Decoration

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P.S. Who here loves a good scale model?

LOOK at these models and WEEP. This is some extreme precision product modelling.

Bread from Scratch. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Ring Dishes

Designed by: Lindsay Emery

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

These things are so pretty. I did not know what a ring dish was until today. Apparently they are “perfectly sized for holding your favourite sparkly rings and other tiny things.” I would be more likely to use them as drip dishes as in the image below.

Or coasters? They look about the right size for a glass. Im not really a ring girl so I’m trying to think up another use for these simply to justify buying one…

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Suite One Studio, Emery’s ceramics studio, creates full size plates and dishes too but the full size indigo ones do not have the gold detailing you can see on these tiny plates (sorry – ring dishes, I’m never going to get used to that!).

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Pink, indigo and pale blue are the only colours Emery is using at the moment and it makes for a very cohesive collection.

If you like her work you should definitely check out Suite One Studio’s Instagram, she is a flat-lay queen.

The dishes are hand thrown porcelain ( I love a good controlled wibbely edge) and the studio use a handmade ivory/white glaze before slinging on the expressive colours.

Suite One Studio-Ring Dish. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Demand outstrips production at the moment so their website’s shop gets updated once a week, usually on a *Thursday* and it sells out fairly fast. Thankfully you are always able to see all of their current collections on the website and on each product’s page you can sign up for a notification on its restock date.

Image Credits: Suite One Studio / Suite One Studio’s Instagram

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Fleur de Lys Goblet

Designer – Van Verre (Company)

-CURVEBALL WARNING-

Van Verre. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Yeah. So… my aesthetic is usually quite sleek, simple and minimal.

But within every minimalist there is an ‘ethnic’, boho hoarder being cajoled into keeping schtum and staying in its box. Its zig-zag, pom-pomed, bejewelled box.

Van Verre. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

There isn’t any need to justify it. This kind of OTT product is stunningly beautiful, though getting the right balance between this ornate glassware and the rest of your room could be a bit tricky!

Rosy, slightly apricot-y, ice lolly fresh. I just want to lick it.

Van Verre. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

This glassware is handmade in Portugal in a workshop that has had 150 years of experience in mixing sand with color pigments. I love how the thick glass base moving up to the thin rim naturally creates an ombré effect. Fantastic glowing colours add to the opulence.

Van Verre.. As seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The process of hand blowing into moulds creates fairly uniform, but unique pieces. I’m particularly taken by the pink wine goblets at the moment but my favourite item and colour preference changes every other month. A sign of a strong collection.

Image Credits: Amara / Van Verre

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Bleu De Four Plates

Designers: Aymeric & Ronan Pailler

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 1

Come the end of October colour is leeching from our meals as broccoli, radishes, and tomatoes step aside for cauliflower, turnip mash, and parsnips.

Delicious!

Well, I add butter to all the latter so thats probably why, but still… delicious.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 2

As yummy as a plate of cream coloured comfort-food tastes, it doesn’t exactly look appetising. There are no contrasting colours to jazz things up. Dun da da Duuuun, thats where these deep, dark, bright plates come in.

I love a dark plate. My favourite in our house is a 6 year old dark grey and black, almost watercolour effect, plate “Mai” from Habitat. I bought it cheap from the staff ‘write-offs’ bin while working there. Food looks fantastic on it, but now that Winter is coming (so everyone keeps reminding us!) I need a bit more colour. The Pailler’s produce a full set of tableware in this range but the simplicity of the plate is divine.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 5

 

Deep, dark, and bright. Thats how I described them a minute ago. The skill in achieving this bright colour, desperately trying to break through a seemingly darker overlay, is in the glazing process.

The white porcelain beneath the glaze is more visible at the edges where there is more tension on the glaze while it is still in liquid form (woop physics!). Because of this the glaze is slightly thinner at the rim, resulting in the edges appearing to glow from within. A high firing temp produces the overall darkness of the pieces. A centuries old process that is worth the price tag.

Bleu De Four as seen on The Product Edit 4

Products available at The Conran Shop in the UK and Site Corot in the EU.

Image Credits: Site Corot / The Conran Shop

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Macchiato Mugs

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Designer: Romy Northover of ‘NO.’ ceramics

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

The proportions of these little macchiato mugs are so well placed and thought out. The long, gaping handles contrast effectively with the espresso sized cups.

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

They’re so beautifully considered that I’m willing to overlook the fact that I only know one person who has ever ordered a macchiato! Though that is entirely my own fault for both being Irish and living in Britain. We only just got coffee shops for realsies in the last 5 years or so. We have other culture OK?! (Our swill baskets for one.)

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

Ms. Northover opened an artist’s space in New York in 2012 at Togei Kyoshitsu, available to students of the traditional Japanese pottery school, where anyone can take classes. Originally trained in European ceramic arts in Venice, Berlin and at Goldsmiths here in London, she changed focus after working in Hong Kong. She now favours the Japanese techniques of Kinuneri (a kneading method that’s also used in making soba-noodle dough), Tebineri (similar to coil pots) and Rokuro (throwing -watch this mesmerising video-). I imagine availing of the classes provided at the artist’s spaces at Togei Kyoshitsu helped her hone her skills.

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

The artistic, painterly brush strokes daubed onto the little mugs perfectly reference the Japanese workmanship. They have a calligraphic flair and a looseness that only comes with years of experience. These mugs are part of the Freedom collection.

‘No.’ ceramics studio is in Long Island City NYC and is stocked around the world but, as always (if you can), its nice to buy direct from the artist at her online shop.

Macchiato Mugs by Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

I can’t finish up this post without showing you Northover’s gorgeous tea cups that lead me to find the ‘No.’ studio range:

Romy Northover as seen on The Product Edit

If you do like her stuff then check out the rest of her work on romyno.com, don’t miss the Mountain Bolt and Tigris collections. For the nosey, like me, check out her Pinterest, where you can really see her influences, especially in ‘World’, ‘Spirit Animal’, and ‘2D’.

Image Credits: Romy No. / No.’s Instagram

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