‘Joy’ Vanity Table

Designed by: Nanna Ditzel

Joy by Nanna Ditzel as seen on The Product Edit

I have loved this vanity table since 2008 when I first came across it. I had chosen Nanna Ditzel as the subject of my terrible poster on ‘a designer you admire’ in first year of university. Nanna seemed like a really cool woman who worked hard and wasn’t afraid to take the credit she deserved for it. Incase you’re not familiar with her, she is a much celebrated Danish woman who graduated Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen in furniture design in 1946. That gives you a sense of time and place for her, a time (but not necessarily a place) that a woman was not expected to excel in fields that required a measure of engineering.

Joy by Nanna Ditzel as seen on The Product Edit

I love the shapes in this piece, spheres, and by extension hemispheres, float my boat. I imagine its for all the same reasons they have floated peoples boats for thousands of years. The wholeness, both the infinity and finality of them, the freedom of movement a rectangle can never dream of!

I’m definitely going to be looking into the psychology of shapes this afternoon. It must affect logo design a lot… Oval logo – ethereal company. Rectangular logo – dependable company.

Joy by Nanna Ditzel as seen on The Product Edit

There is something about the table part that reminds me of chunky toddler toys, the kind where you have to put the cube through the square and the cylinder through the circle etc. and also Duplo, Lego’s baby brother. I must have had some sort of toy that swung, or slotted in and out, like the drawers of this vanity table. The connection totally works for me, I very much feel like I’m playing dress up when I put on make-up or adjust my hair.

Joy by Nanna Ditzel as seen on The Product Edit

As part of the Joy bedroom range this is one of the only items still in production, a Joy bench that I’m not so hot on, but looks super comfy, also prevails. Produced in maple now from the Danish company Getama.

And in the interest of of giving you a giggle, here is a screenshot of that poster I mentioned. I cut it out along that line.. Yes sir-ee I did.

Julia Jacob's 1st Yr at MMU poster on Nanna Ditzel

Image Credits: Nanna Ditzel / Getama / Author’s Own

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3legs tables

Designer: David Tarcali at “Studio Nomad”

3legs Table Collection as seen on The Product Edit

I have been wanting to show you these tables for a loooong time now but it has never really seemed like the right day. A lot is riding on this you see… Because if you don’t loose your s*** over these sumptuous Venus-de-Tables (secretly, on the inside of course – we’re still pretending we’re normal to non-furniture obsessed folk right?) then I’m not sure we can be friends.

There. I said it.

3legs Table Collection as seen on The Product Edit

There is a graceful glamour to these pieces. The colours and the arrangement of the hemispheres make them aerial and light. The little collection has rhythm.

3legs Table Collection as seen on The Product Edit

Huunnnnghhh *flaps arms like a two year old* I just found out while doing some extra research that these tables have just been used for window displays by my favourite fashion house COS! All my design faves are hooking up, switt swooo!

cos

Ok, I’m calm.

3legs Table Collection as seen on The Product Edit

Price wise, they’re all €300 or under. Studio Nomad tell us that you can get it made in any RAL colour but they don’ t say how much extra that is. I’ll have a look into that for you and put it in a comment below. Here is the RAL colour chart from the company I use for my bent steel work: RAL Colour Chart . Though be warned, no online, or printed, colour chart is ever a perfect match!

P.s. Here is an extra little cutie they make… 28degrees

28 Degrees as seen on The Product Edit

You can buy the tables at Crowdy House for a limited time, after that I’d just contact Studio Nomad themselves (always the best way!).

Image Credits: Studio Nomad on Bēhance and Instagram.

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The Wave Cabinet

Designer: Sebastian ErraZuriz

The Wave Cabinet as seen on The Product EditThe Wave Cabinet as seen on The Product Edit

This cabinet looks like it’d be amazing to use. I’d be opening and closing it every time I passed by!

The Wave Cabinet as seen on The Product Edit

Another reason I need want this cabinet is that (as well as the pleasure I’d get from tipping and pitching the batons) it wouldn’t let me collect a home bar, an indoor cactus garden or any other decadent clutter on top of it. Which is a desirable restriction for me; I am caught between minimalist and bohemian style.  If any furniture can force minimalism on me in an interesting way like this, I am in.

The Wave Cabinet as seen on The Product Edit

The echo in the video below makes the batons sound pretty heavy but I don’t think that’s the case. Either way, they flow really beautifully. This cabinet has made a lasting impression on me. I’ve not even used it yet!  I love it. Watch the video, I want it as much as I wanted a ‘super soaker’ in baby school. It looks FUN!

I first saw this cabinet on Core 77

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Image Source: Sebastian ErraZuriz Studio

Video Source: Sebastian Errazuriz Studio’s Vimeo

Swill Bench

Designers: Lorna Singleton & Sebastian Cox

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Lorna Singleton is one of the young adults who have taken up the practice of Cumbrian swill basketry, learning from the South Lakes craftsman Owen Jones. Swilling is a process of tearing Oak along the grain of wood in order to keep the wood’s inherent strength and flexibility. The much less flexible alternative, timber, must be sawn across the grain at some point, which loses strength when we do so.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Oak swill strips, when woven, can hold similar weights as timber at a fraction of the thickness. This has allowed Singleton & Cox to design this bench, and an accompanying stool, with a beautifully slim profile.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Cox, a hugely successful woodworking studio (who’s work I’m sure I will write about more fully soon), manufactures the gently tapered English ash frame and Singleton weaves the English oak swill seats. The result is tactile, sturdy and achingly well proportioned.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

Both these items, and a couple that are a slightly more rustic, are for sale at The New Craftsman. It is worth noting, to their credit, that Singleton and Cox both manage coppiced woodland in Cumbria and Kent respectively and supply themselves with their own wood. Prices reflect this.

Swill Bench as seen on The Product Edit

More of Sebastian Cox’s work can be seen at sebastiancox.co.uk

Image Credit : The New Craftsman

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Melt (pendant)

Designer: Tom Dixon and FRONT

Tom Dixon's 'Melt' as seen on The Product Edit

I feel like I should really like Tom Dixon’s work. It has all the shapes I like. He uses metallics and angles. Often together! Yes – good stuff. So why doesn’t it sing to me in the way it seems to for others? Bit too Marcel Wanders-y for me maybe, too “out there”? I figured it out a bit yesterday, while having a browse through the glory of the ‘designjunction’ Milan aftermath. I found a really beautiful, swelling pendant that gives the impression of just-blown glass.

Tom Dixon's 'Melt' as seen on The Product Edit

Brief bit of info on the pendants themselves; they are vacuum formed polycarbonate with copper, gold and chrome particles applied to their interior. So that’s a whole new thing. They also do the hide and seek game – when you turn the light off, the lack of light behind this new material changes the level of transparency as you can see in the photo above. Charming by day, mysterious and transcendental by night.

Tom Dixon's 'Melt' as seen on The Product EditTom Dixon's 'Melt' as seen on The Product Edit

As far as my personal er, non-connection with most of Tom Dixon’s designs, my new found opinion is that they work best in commercial spaces. And I’m just not in the habit of thinking in terms of public spaces like theatres and retail parks yet. I love these pendants, I love them in herds, shoals and parliaments (isn’t that owls? A parliament of owls? Hah) Their liveliness feeds off each other in a really striking way.

Tom Dixon's 'Melt' as seen on The Product Edit

But they look a bit lost on their own, or in threes. And that how I usually think of products. Big commercial, industrial stuff is all really popular now for urban home interiors and I am not adverse to that at all (heck I too have a photographers floor lamp in the corner of my living) so why don’t I enjoy the image I get of a couple of Dixon’s of lighting pendants or bits and bobs scattered around the home?

Tom Dixon's 'Melt' as seen on The Product Edit

I think it’s because the utilitarian or commercial use items that we now have in our homes are from designs created decades ago. Because Dixon’s forms are all so new, we’re just not used to his particular way of mixing up his personal style, chosen material or colour, and the context.

Tom Dixon's 'Melt' as seen on The Product Edit

For now, in our minds, it is hard to accept these bizarre objects into our cosy homes that we’ve been filing with mainly ceramics, wood and textiles for thousands of years.

Tom Dixon's 'Melt' as seen on The Product Edit

Give it a decade or two though and I think things like these strange creations will be lighting up our dining tables.  Just like that industrial lamp you have over yours now.  Though, in fairness, weren’t hover cars meant to be a staple already!? C’mon Honda… power of dreams and all that?

Image Credits: BN DeStem Wonen / Tom DixonCore 77 / PSFKDeZeen / Plus Shop (on instagram) / Casa Vogue / Inred Hemma

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