Punt Carafe

Designers: Lucy and Tobie Snowdowne (Two Create)

Two Create's Punt Carafe as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

A punt is the little hillock that you find indented in the bottom of wine bottles.

It’s a structural device, and strengthens the bottle a lot, but when I was younger I thought it was just a sneaky way to get less juice in my Ribena bottle. Cynical child!

Two Create's Punt Carafe as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The punts in this set are rewardingly full bodied. The smokey colour really emphasises the shapeliness too, darkening at the bulge where you are looking through three or four layers of the glass.

In researching this glassware I found out that the Snowdownes designed it for Habitat. I should have known! You can take the girl outta Habitat but, you can’t take Habitat out of the the cailín!

The shape of the glass slots perfectly on, to halo the carafe, when the pieces are put together as they are intended.

Two Create's Punt Carafe as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Image Credits: Two Create / Coin Quest / Joel’s Coins

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P.S. A punt is also the name of the Irish one pound coin that we used up until the Euro came in. All of the old Irish coinage was really beautiful, it documented our most beloved Irish wildlife.

The Stag was on the punt itself. What a beauty. ?

 

Irish Punt as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

 

Estudos Geométrico 3

(Geometric Study 3)

Designer: Naima Almaida

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Remember fuzzy felt?!

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Alameda (business name: Lhama)’s artworks are made with felt pieces cut, embedded, overlapped and glued by hand in her studio in São Paulo, Brazil. The compositions are so thoughtfully considered.

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The extreme layering in her geometric pieces makes them really luxurious.

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Most of her work is tropical themed and has less of this repeated layering that you can see here but I think she has struck gold with Estudos Geométrico 3. I won’t lie though, it was her rich tropical pieces that caught my eye on Instagram.

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I’m so used to the current Rob Ryan-esque style of cut out art that I wrongly presumed that Alameda’s work was fairly small, about the size of a piece of printer paper.

But this geometric study is about twice that size and all the better for it! Some pieces are much larger again.

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

If you’re going to buy a statement piece I believe in going all out. Why else would I be (moderately) minimal elsewhere in the home? In order to go bonkers with art! The simple, white ‘box’ frame that comes with Estudos Geométrico 3 knows what I’m on about.

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Naima Almaida (Lhama) as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I am one of the 26,547 people who have signed up for the “30 Days of Wild” challenge that The Wildlife Trusts have set up this month in order to help us make room for nature in our lives. Researching into Lhama’s jungle pieces was something I did for myself as part of this challenge, from England to Brazil – and I hope you feel the wild in art wherever you are in the world too! ?

#30dayswild

Image Credits: LhamaLhama’s Instagram / Alameda’s Pinterestfatdormouse

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Large Monthly Planner

Designed by: JStory

JStory's large monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I am loving Korea right now.

Japanese design has always been my favourite but boy does it take itself seriously. Korean design, for me, has the same attention to detail but with some added fun and playfulness.

Storey's large + medium monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.ukI know this monthly planner might not seem fun and joyful to some people but look at how ridiculously big the Big one ends up being when opened out!

JStory's big monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

JStory's big monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Fun right? Riiiiiight?!

And the Mini one looks comically small in comparison.

JStory's mini monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

In their own environments, Mini in a pocket / Big propped up against a wall, they are perfect for their space but they do make me laugh side by side.

JStory's large monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The stitching is a line! ?

The simplicity of the grid system, no numbers or months, makes this planner extra useful. You can skip a month / a week or whatever and not lose a whole spread, just pick up where you left off.

JStory's large monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Here is the size run-down;

A3 – Big Monthly Planner

A4 – Large Monthly Planner

A5 – Medium Monthly Planner

A6 – Small Monthly Planner

A7 – Mini Monthly Planner

If you want the measurements Google it. I must spend 1/3 of my time at a computer Googling how big an A4, A6 or A3 page is. WRITE IT OUT JULIA. If I make myself suffer to try and force myself to remember page dimensions I’m certainly going to extend the same curtesy to you.

You’re welcome!

Let me know if you ever learn them. I seem incapable.

JStory's medium monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

JStory's mini monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

If you’re living in the UK, like Moi, you can use JStory’s Amazon Shop as JStory’s own website’s international section is in dollars, I’m not even sure they’re US dollars. US peeps can use Mochi Things or Poketo.

P.S.    Oh my gawd. I was just making sure that that Jstory link above was correct and I noticed that they now do the planners in black on black and grey on grey. There aren’t enough images to re-do this whole article but you do need to see the restrained beauty…

JStory's large monthly planner as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Grey on grey everyday.

Image Credits: JStory / Mochi Things / Poketo

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Current Window

Designer: Marjan van Aubel

Marjan van Aubel's Current Window as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I came across the current windows when I was exhibiting at LDF 2015 but I was too in awe of “Mise-en-abyme” by Laetitia de Allegri and Matteo Fogale to write about it straight away!

Marjan van Aubel's Current Window as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

As the months have passed though I’ve thought about this product much more than Allegri and Fogale’s art piece.

A solar panelled window. It’s genius!

Marjan van Aubel's Current Window as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Most modern western homes probably have at least two frosted windows in it’s two bathrooms. I even had one in my bedroom growing up. And my Mum made an embroidered modesty panel on the lower half of the window in the spare room, which they use as a dressing room (too many books in their bedroom!). That makes four in the family house I grew up in.

Marjan van Aubel's Current Window as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Now, my Mum is super creative so she also actually made the stained glass window in the bathroom. It’s got stars, indigo panels, and little bits of mirror.

Very pretty.

It would be extra cool if it could add to the house’s electricity supply.

Marjan van Aubel's Current Window as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Window pane solar panels capture about 10% efficiency of the sun. 10% sounds worse than it is; this window takes about 7hrs to save enough energy to recharge a modern phone.

Think of all the industry and hours of labour needed to get that energy to your home when the energy itself is produced off site!

Marjan van Aubel's Current Window as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Interestingly, different colours harness different amounts of energy. I think the colours that van Aubel has created are really beautiful. Framed in white, the graphic, triangular structure of the window panels add to this gentle beauty.

Marjan van Aubel's Current Window as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

The window-sill has USB ports flush with the product and a series of diagonal stripes show you how much energy the sill has stored within its battery.

Marjan van Aubel's Current Window as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

van Aubel founded the company Caventou with two others to focus on this emerging design and technology. Their tagline is “Integrating solar technology naturally into our daily lives.” Have a look at their beautiful video below, they explain it all better than me, I’m really just here to say “Look, Look!”.

The same principals have been applied to this table for home or office use. Elegant aye!?

Marjan van Aubel's Current Table as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

I love the echo of the triangulation of the window panes in the frame of the table. Ah cohesion.

Marjan van Aubel's Current Table as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

Image Credits: Marjan van Aubel / Caventou / Vimeo

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Cabinet

Designer: Marius Valaitis

Marius Valaitis as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk

This cabinet is visually simple and feels honest. A lot of designers hide away the nuts / bolts / edges of a product and conversely a lot of designers make a big hullabaloo of their raw material and oldey-worldy fixtures.

Valaitis’ design is balanced nicely in the middle of these two ways of working.

Marius Valaitis as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk 1

For example the casters are just castors, fully functional.

Lithuanian furniture designer Valaitis isn’t trying to hide the fact that they’re just castors by having a skirt of wood around the base of the cabinet. He’s also not tooting his own horn with really big steam-punk casters to say ‘look guys – its INDUSTRIAL!’

They are just casters. Lovely.

Marius Valaitis as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk 1

The proportions of the piece of furniture are really to my taste. A little bit squat and snug, just right for a printer and some paper bits.

I hate my printer.

It does not deserve a nice cabinet like this.

If it jams a piece of paper it does not reprint the page it missed. Big deal right? But it does it a few times a day (I have had it serviced)! I have to figure out what page is missing, go back into my document, isolate the page in the ‘print’ pop up box and send it to the printer all over again. And sometimes it’ll do it twice in one document. *Rage Shudder*.

The printer that my family had twenty years ago always reprinted the missing page straight away before it carried on with the rest of the document. TWENTY YEARS AGO!

Sorry lovely cabinet. Sorry that my printer fury has hijacked your blog post.

Marius Valaitis as seen on www.TheProductEdit.uk 1

I’d shove it in this beautifully finished drawer for ever and ever.

Image Credits: Marius Valaitis’ Tumblr

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